About your Search

20100901
20100930
STATION
WUSA (CBS) 6
KPIX (CBS) 5
WJZ (CBS) 5
LANGUAGE
English 16
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
.s. and canada, including toys with small pieces that are a choking hazard. and tricycle tricycles and highs with protruding pieces that can cut a child. so far, 17 injuries have been reported. overseas there's a potential standoff between the u.s. and a key ally in the war on terror. pakistan today closed an important border crossing for trucks that supply coalition forces in afghanistan. it was a retaliation for a nato helicopter attack inside pakistan in which three pack taken soldiers were killed by mistake. in washington, a change of tone is coming to the white house and the worst-kept secret in town, president obama will announce tomorrow that chief of staff rahm emanuel is taking his brash, combative style home to chicago to run for mayor. he'll be replayed, at least temporarily, by the more mild-mannered pete rouse, who was mr. obama's chief of staff in the senate. and still ahead here on the cbs evening news, remembering a kid from the bronx who became a star. but up next, the unseen risk at the hospital, a deadly new class of superbugs. >> couric: america's hospitals are places of
told cur cure he hopes the film promotes action. >> it features jeffrey canada who shows it's possible to create jet stream great schools even in poor neighborhoods. this week the department of education announced grants to replicate his success in 20 more cities. >> it's not an issue that we should put our heads in the sand. we could actually fix this. >> reporter: but critics of the movie say it unfairly targets public schools, their teachers and unions. >> i thought it was a little slanted because i think that there are a lot of great public schools with great teachers and great administrators and great families. >> reporter: still... >> does anyone in your group think the status quo is working? >> no, not at all. >> reporter: they also agree on what's at stake. >> you know, i want to be a teacher. >> reporter: a child's future. >> i want to be a nurse. i want to be a doctor. >> reporter: michelle miller, cbs news, new york. >> couric: and you can see my complete interview with davis guggenheim on my webcast on cbsnews.com. that is the cbs news for tonight. thank you fur watching. i
in vancouver, canada. as children went back to school this week, traffic safety officials placed a 3 d sign on a busy street. it looks like a little girl chasing a ball, but it's actually an optical illusion, a virtual reminder to drivers to slow down and keep their eyes on the road. katie is in los angeles tonight getting ready for tomorrow's special stan broadcast. stand up to cancer broadcast. katie. >> couric:ed stand up 2 cancer funds dream team friday all across the country, scientists from different institutions working together to fight this disease. up next you'll meet the dream team that's targeting pancreatic cancer and the progress that's being made. >> couric: tomorrow night, cbs and the other major networks are joining forces once again to bring you stand up 2 cancer, a program designed to raise awareness of the disease and raise money to fight it. some of that money is funding research against one of the deadliest forms of cancer, pancreatic. this year, more than 43,000 americans will be diagnosed with it, and nearly 37,000 will die of it. it's already claimed the lives of pe
they are stocking up, boarding up, and moving out from the carolinas to canada. i'm erica hill. also tonight, a scare in the gulf. after an oil platform explodes in flames, forcing the crew into the water. the dramatic video that's raising new questions about police using taser guns. >> stop resisting! stop resisting! >> and a group of young people who have made happiness contagious. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> good evening. katie is off. much of the east coast is on alert tonight for hurricane earl. as many as 26 million people could soon be feeling its impact. even if the storm never makes landfall. earl is a category three storm right now with sustained winds of more than 111 miles an hour. the eye now less than 200 miles from cape hatteras, north carolina, and it's outer banks that could be the first to feel the effects of the hurricane before it takes an expected turn to the northeast. warnings and watches are up from north carolina, where at least 100,000 people have been ordered to evacu
but one manufacturer, bombardier of canada. federal records show in the last two years, there have been only two such incidents involving airliners made by other companies but in that time you have the six bombardier incidents, two in the last four days plus chicago, atlanta, ontario, california, and philadelphia. in each case, the planes landed safely without injuries to those on board, but with that many accidents involving similar aircraft made pie by the same company, authorities want to know if that's a pattern. the f.a.a. and national transportation safety board are investigating and aviation investigators say wear and tear could be an issue. >> they're designed and used for short-haul uses of passengers so they may take off and land three five, seven, 10 times a day sometimes. so their landing gear are put under a lot more stress. >> reporter: today bombardier said it would support any investigation. dean reynolds, cbs news, chicago. >> couric: in health news, there's been a lot of debate about what causes attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, commonly called a.d.h.d. some sa
between the u.s. and canada ruptured, pouring at least 800,000 gallons of crude in the waterway surrounding this town. fouling the air with a noxious odor, threatening the water and, as seen in this home video, drenching local wildlife. now, that mess has turned into another one. the canadian energy giant that owns the pipeline, enbridge, is accused of deceptive tactics by dozens of homeowners affected by the spill. >> they don't know what they're signing and they sign a lot of their rights if they don't know what they're signing. >> reporter: in a giant investigation with the center for public integrity, cbs news obtained these two documents. one is this settlement form. some residents claim the company coerced them to sign it for a $300 air purifier and some evacuation expenses. in exchange releasing enbridge from and against all liability, claims and actions. the company disputes that. the other document was this release form allowing enbridge access to any and all medical records, one that had to be signed, residents claim, before enbridge would pay for a visit to a clinic.
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)